Another bloody food blog

It’s a bit more expensive than the ubiquitous supermarket varieties but this Norwegian smoked salmon from Hansen & Lydersen is whole lot tastier too. Fabulous colour and cut to a good thickness for texture.
http://www.hansen-lydersen.com/169718/salmon/
http://www.generalsto.re

— 10 months ago
Dry aged rib of beef from Flock and Herd Butchery in London SE15. Got very trad with this, yorkshire puddings and a horseradish cream, but there is a reason why this dish remains a stalwart. A well aged joint speaks for itself. Don’t add the batter mix for the puddings to anything other than boiling hot beef dripping. And horeradish prepared in advance, needs a couple of hours for the flavour to develop.

Dry aged rib of beef from Flock and Herd Butchery in London SE15. Got very trad with this, yorkshire puddings and a horseradish cream, but there is a reason why this dish remains a stalwart. A well aged joint speaks for itself. Don’t add the batter mix for the puddings to anything other than boiling hot beef dripping. And horeradish prepared in advance, needs a couple of hours for the flavour to develop.

— 1 year ago with 1 note
This is one of the most memorable desserts I have had in recent years, probably because I didn’t make any of it. All very simple stuff, I purchased some cannelle and a tarte orange from the patissier Stohrer (famed for introducing the bistro classic rum baba or baba au rhum to Paris in the early 18th C.) on Rue Montorgueil, a street in the 2nd arrondissement of Paris renowned for food shopping. Though all very nice it wasn’t the pattiserie itself that  I recall, it was the accompaniments here that really set it apart.
First of all a fabulous crème cru, a sour cream from Normandy. When sourced correctly it really is the crème de la crème  (sorry).
The excuse to include alcohol as part of the dessert though is what the occassion was all about. I’m not always in the mood for dessert wines but a friend procured this slightly grand bottle of Chateau Guiraud 1er Grand Cru. It was magnificent with the combination of sweet and sharp dessert, the wine itself not too sweet as often the cheaper, younger sauternes seem to be, this being of 1989 vintage and a bit of a luxury of course…but that means you can have more than one glass, even finish the bottle if you are desperate in your decadence. Definitely a call to recreate this at home.
http://chateauguiraud.fr/en/index.php?act=3
http://www.stohrer.fr/?lang=en

This is one of the most memorable desserts I have had in recent years, probably because I didn’t make any of it. All very simple stuff, I purchased some cannelle and a tarte orange from the patissier Stohrer (famed for introducing the bistro classic rum baba or baba au rhum to Paris in the early 18th C.) on Rue Montorgueil, a street in the 2nd arrondissement of Paris renowned for food shopping. Though all very nice it wasn’t the pattiserie itself that  I recall, it was the accompaniments here that really set it apart.

First of all a fabulous crème cru, a sour cream from Normandy. When sourced correctly it really is the crème de la crème  (sorry).

The excuse to include alcohol as part of the dessert though is what the occassion was all about. I’m not always in the mood for dessert wines but a friend procured this slightly grand bottle of Chateau Guiraud 1er Grand Cru. It was magnificent with the combination of sweet and sharp dessert, the wine itself not too sweet as often the cheaper, younger sauternes seem to be, this being of 1989 vintage and a bit of a luxury of course…but that means you can have more than one glass, even finish the bottle if you are desperate in your decadence. Definitely a call to recreate this at home.

http://chateauguiraud.fr/en/index.php?act=3

http://www.stohrer.fr/?lang=en

— 1 year ago with 1 note
The humble burger is and always will be close to the top of the food tree for me. Minced this meat myself this afternoon from a bit of chuck steak procured from my new butcher Flock and Herd which opened a couple of weeks ago at the bottom of my street. He also stocks beef dripping so the chips served here complimented the burger very nicely.A burger sauce made from the very finest burgundian mustard, some ketchup and a little mayo, rocket, gerkin, tomato and some cheddar melted on top. now if I could just find some decent burger buns we’d be set. Good Saturday night fodder.
http://www.flockandherd.com/

The humble burger is and always will be close to the top of the food tree for me. Minced this meat myself this afternoon from a bit of chuck steak procured from my new butcher Flock and Herd which opened a couple of weeks ago at the bottom of my street. He also stocks beef dripping so the chips served here complimented the burger very nicely.A burger sauce made from the very finest burgundian mustard, some ketchup and a little mayo, rocket, gerkin, tomato and some cheddar melted on top. now if I could just find some decent burger buns we’d be set. Good Saturday night fodder.

http://www.flockandherd.com/

— 1 year ago
LARDER
Pork shoulder slow cooked in milk and white burgundy. The thick layer of fat from the top was removed and made into crackling. The milk should curdle after a few hours cooking developing a rich flavour on the outside of the meat. Served up with steamed carrot and potato, a delicious autumnal dish. There are a number of recipes around this theme on the internet, look them up.

LARDER

Pork shoulder slow cooked in milk and white burgundy. The thick layer of fat from the top was removed and made into crackling. The milk should curdle after a few hours cooking developing a rich flavour on the outside of the meat. Served up with steamed carrot and potato, a delicious autumnal dish. There are a number of recipes around this theme on the internet, look them up.

— 1 year ago
LARDER
The concept of a good thai restaurant has always been something of a misnomer to me. While varying quality of the produce on offer was notable I had never really had an experience that was genuinely satifying. The Begging Bowl on Bellenden Road (my hood) has sought to change perceptions of thai food from a staple of the cheap pub grub market to a destination cuisine. Reviews are good and the volume of custom speaks, er, volumes on a site occupied by a succession of failed restaurant ventures. An excellent compliment to Ganapati, a well established south indian dining house that for a number of years has solely propped up the misconception that Bellenden road is a gentrified end of SE15.
Pleasurable experience from start to finish, to finally eat a thai fish cake that lives up to the imagination the title suggests was progressive. The brilliant marketing illusion created by endless free rice is genius. The establishment doesn’t have to compromise quality elsewhere to deliver this promise as they only give you an inch at a time and your gut instincts are satisfied at the end of your meal that you didn’t stuff them full of the world’s most proloific grain just cause it was there (on the subject of oryzan love the sticky variety was excellent but it was the crispy version served the peanut sauced chicken that was particularly pleasing; think of a savoury, salty Beta Bar those that are old enough to remember).
I found it reassuringly smug that the only green curry on offer here was that of rabbit, a bold move indeed in a country that has adopted this particular vertibrate as a pet since myxomatosis gave the consumption of poor little bunnies such a bad rep…but sentimentality won’t hamper the desires of the metropolitan elite in search of austerity-esque dining opportunities.Forgotten cuts are zietgeist.
Didn’t try the wine, reputedly overpriced and under sourced but what’s new, like every watering hole in town so I just had some nice ones when I got home instead. It’s a canteen experience and not a night on the town but very satisfying. Will happily go back two or three times in a year for those fishcakes. If they did take away it would be more frequent. ****
http://www.thebeggingbowl.co.uk/

LARDER

The concept of a good thai restaurant has always been something of a misnomer to me. While varying quality of the produce on offer was notable I had never really had an experience that was genuinely satifying. The Begging Bowl on Bellenden Road (my hood) has sought to change perceptions of thai food from a staple of the cheap pub grub market to a destination cuisine. Reviews are good and the volume of custom speaks, er, volumes on a site occupied by a succession of failed restaurant ventures. An excellent compliment to Ganapati, a well established south indian dining house that for a number of years has solely propped up the misconception that Bellenden road is a gentrified end of SE15.

Pleasurable experience from start to finish, to finally eat a thai fish cake that lives up to the imagination the title suggests was progressive. The brilliant marketing illusion created by endless free rice is genius. The establishment doesn’t have to compromise quality elsewhere to deliver this promise as they only give you an inch at a time and your gut instincts are satisfied at the end of your meal that you didn’t stuff them full of the world’s most proloific grain just cause it was there (on the subject of oryzan love the sticky variety was excellent but it was the crispy version served the peanut sauced chicken that was particularly pleasing; think of a savoury, salty Beta Bar those that are old enough to remember).

I found it reassuringly smug that the only green curry on offer here was that of rabbit, a bold move indeed in a country that has adopted this particular vertibrate as a pet since myxomatosis gave the consumption of poor little bunnies such a bad rep…but sentimentality won’t hamper the desires of the metropolitan elite in search of austerity-esque dining opportunities.Forgotten cuts are zietgeist.

Didn’t try the wine, reputedly overpriced and under sourced but what’s new, like every watering hole in town so I just had some nice ones when I got home instead. It’s a canteen experience and not a night on the town but very satisfying. Will happily go back two or three times in a year for those fishcakes. If they did take away it would be more frequent. ****

http://www.thebeggingbowl.co.uk/



— 1 year ago

LARDER

Guinea Fowl & Ham Hock Cutting Pie

A friend of mine made this fabulous cold cutting pie a few nights ago. He based the pastry on the recipe you’ll find here http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2007/nov/24/foodanddrink.baking55 , using half the stated quantities and slightly altered by using all plain flour, and added an egg yolk before pouring in the hot lard.

The filling was a guinea fowl, cooked for an hour or so in a stove top pot with carrot, onion, tarragon, thyme, Noilly Prat vermouth & water and then left overnight, the leftover stock retained to make the jelly. A stuffing with onions, breadcrumbs, sage and a couple of deskinned chipolatas, roasted until cooked through was added to the filling.
 
When the pastry had hardened the filling was added, a layer of pre-cooked ham hock (this could be cooked with the guinea fowl)  and a layer of stuffing in first, then the bird flesh, then more stuffing and ham. It all went into the oven for about 50 mins. Once had cooled the molten jelly is poured through a little hole in the top of the pastry lid. The pie should be left overnight to cool.

— 1 year ago with 1 note

Moroccan Slow Cooked Shin of Beef

Absolutely delicious alternative to cooking indian curries, here’s a great way to use cheap slow cooking cuts of beef. Add a generous handful of chopped medjool dates about one hour from the end of cooking to give a sweet depth of flavour to this….and pretty much anything else you fancy too. Proportions of ingredients are variable to taste but this is a good guide.

1kg beef (shin in this insatnce)

1 1/2 onions chopped

4 garlis cloves finely chopped or grated

2 teaspoons of Ras el Hanout (mixture of spices, google it)

1/4 tsp of cayenne pepper

1/4 tsp ground black pepper

3 ripe tomatoes, skinned and deseeded (put them in boiling water to remove the skins. God, I’m like Delia Smith here)

Finely grated peel from 1 lemon and a squeexe of the juice. Preserved lemons (1 1/2) would be good if you happen to have some but I couldn’t be bothered.

2 tsp honey

1 tblsp chopped corriander

2 tblsp parsley

Trim the beef of excess fat (you need a bit to keep ther beef tender but remove any large bits) and cut into 2.5 cm cubes. Brown the meat in a heavy casserole with the Ras el Hanout then remove and set aside. Add the oil to the casserole and when hot (but not too hot) add the onion, garlic, cayenne, black pepper and salt. When the onions have softened put the meat back in with the tomotoes, honey, and everything else. Cover the casserole and stick it in the oven on a low heat (gas mk1.5 or about 120 c) for 3.5 hours.

You may need to add a little water at the start, a bit more Ras el Hanout at 2.5 hours. Check the tenderness of the meat periodically (depends on cut) and serve with rice or cous cous.


— 1 year ago
#Beef shin  #morrocan recipe 
SCULLERY
Just purchased this Wusthof two grade wet stone, I had only ever used a steel to sharpen knives before but this makes all the difference. And it’s pretty. And really not very expensive.
http://www.wusthof.ca/

SCULLERY

Just purchased this Wusthof two grade wet stone, I had only ever used a steel to sharpen knives before but this makes all the difference. And it’s pretty. And really not very expensive.

http://www.wusthof.ca/

— 1 year ago
CELLAR
Manhattan
75ml bourbon or rye whisky
25ml punt e mes vermouth
Dash of angostura bitters

Pour ingredients over ice. Stirred not shaken. Rub a piece of orange zest around the rim of a champagne bowl and pour into the glass through a strainer. Repeat process until thoroughly inebriated while posting your favourite tunes from your youth on Facebook. Maraschino cherry on a stick optional.

CELLAR

Manhattan

75ml bourbon or rye whisky

25ml punt e mes vermouth

Dash of angostura bitters


Pour ingredients over ice. Stirred not shaken. Rub a piece of orange zest around the rim of a champagne bowl and pour into the glass through a strainer. Repeat process until thoroughly inebriated while posting your favourite tunes from your youth on Facebook. Maraschino cherry on a stick optional.

— 1 year ago with 17 notes
#Manhattan cocktail  #cocktail recipe  #bourbon  #vermouth